Study on the ethical concepts of the Japanese writer Yukio Mishima, ultra-nationalist. (Article, 2000) [WorldCat.org]
skip to content
New WorldCat.org coming soon
Study on the ethical concepts of the Japanese writer Yukio Mishima, ultra-nationalist.
Checking...

Study on the ethical concepts of the Japanese writer Yukio Mishima, ultra-nationalist.

Author: K Yamamoto Affiliation: Kyushu Institute of Design, Fukuoka, Japan.
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Collegium antropologicum, v24 n2 (200012): 597-605
Summary:
After WWII, ultra-nationalism, which was the leading ideology of wartime Japan, seemed to have lost its power to inspire the Japanese. In the 1960s, when the Japanese began to enjoy economic prosperity, Yukio Mishima, deploring that the Japanese were losing the traditional spirit and morality of the nation, was one of those citizens who felt a strong nostalgia for wartime Japan. In an attempt to revive the spiritual  Read more...
More like this
&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving;

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: Mishima, Y
Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: K Yamamoto Affiliation: Kyushu Institute of Design, Fukuoka, Japan.
ISSN:0350-6134
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 122158667
Awards:

Abstract:

After WWII, ultra-nationalism, which was the leading ideology of wartime Japan, seemed to have lost its power to inspire the Japanese. In the 1960s, when the Japanese began to enjoy economic prosperity, Yukio Mishima, deploring that the Japanese were losing the traditional spirit and morality of the nation, was one of those citizens who felt a strong nostalgia for wartime Japan. In an attempt to revive the spiritual exaltation of wartime Japan, Mishima took radical action as an ultra-nationalist, and killed himself by Hara-kiri. Mishima's ethical concepts, which center on the ethos of warriors who dedicate themselves to the defense of their commune, have structural similarities to the ethical structure of the Kanun, which may be called the ethics of "blood". Mishima's theory of ultra-nationalism has a paradoxical logic, which seems to be related to the ethical concepts of a society without state power.

Reviews

Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Similar Items

User lists with this item (1)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.