Renaissance art (Book, 2007) [WorldCat.org]
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Renaissance art

Author: Cristina Bucci; Susanna Buricchi
Publisher: New York : Barnes & Nobles, 2007. ©2007
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
This beautifully illustrated book offers the reader a rich and colorful panorama of Renaissance art as it developed in the 15th and 16th centuries. It explores Florence under the Medici and the advances made in Rome and Venice, but also covers changes taking place in Flanders and the rest of Europe. Works of art are given full-page illustrations, with additional enlargements. These are accompanied by texts exploring  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Cristina Bucci; Susanna Buricchi
ISBN: 9780760788868 0760788863
OCLC Number: 164325481
Notes: Includes index.
Description: 431 pages : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Contents: The study of antiquity. Ancient words in a new language ; Love of antiquity and expressive tension: Andrea Mantegna ; The rediscovery of sculpture in the round and movement --
The discovery of perspective. The innovators ; Transition and experimentation --
The detailed depiction of reality. LIght in Flemish painting ; Portrait painting in Northern Europe ; Daily life in sacred Flemish painting ; Landscape in Flemish painting ; Commercial exchange and artistic relations between Northern and Southern Europe ; Devotion and realism --
Man at the center of the universe. The portrait ; Equestrian and funerary monuments ; Men, saints and heroes ; Art and science --
The Venetian scene. Giovanni Bellini and Venetian classicism --
Lorenzo the Magnificent. Artists at the time of Lorenzo the Magnificent ; Art in Rome at the time of Sixtus IV and Alexander VI ; The early years of Leonardo and Michelangelo in Florence ; Bramante and Leonardo in Milan ; Michelangelo: the early years --
Florence and the birth of the "modern manner". Leonardo in Florence ; The presence of Michelangelo ; Raphael in Florence ; Michelangelo's last years in Florence --
The artistic supremacy of Rome. The architecture of Bramante ; The project for St. Peter's ; Michelangelo in the service of Juluis II ; Raphael for Julius II ; Raphael and Leo X: the rebirth of antiquity ; Grotesque decoration in the school of Raphael ; Raphael the architect in the service of Agostino Chigi ; Rome at the time of Bramante, Raphael and Michelangelo --
Venice and the birth of tonal painting. The revolutionary work of Giorgione ; The late works of Giovanni Bellini ; Early Titian: naturalism and the classical restraint ; The contributions of Giorgione and Titian ; Contact with the north: Albrecht Dürer in Venice --
The Renaissance in crisis: the emergence of Mannerism. Art in Europe from the Renaissance to Mannerism ; Rome in the mid-sixteenth century: the papacy of Paul III Farnese --
Venice in the second half of the sixteenth century. Titian's late works: the free handling of paint ; Mannerism in Venice ; The chief painters after Titian: Tintoretto, Veronese and Jacopo Bassano ; The architect of Andrea Palladio ; Theaters.
Responsibility: texts by Cristina Bucci, Susanna Buricchi.

Abstract:

This beautifully illustrated book offers the reader a rich and colorful panorama of Renaissance art as it developed in the 15th and 16th centuries. It explores Florence under the Medici and the advances made in Rome and Venice, but also covers changes taking place in Flanders and the rest of Europe. Works of art are given full-page illustrations, with additional enlargements. These are accompanied by texts exploring the historical and cultural background of the climate that favored the birth of these great works. The Renaissance was essentially a return to the interests and concerns of the classical period. Brunelleschi built the dome on the cathedral of Florence; Donatello revived the Roman art of casting statues. A new solemnity and measured harmony infiltrated the arts and rapidly overshadowed gothic culture. In Florence, there was an extraordinary cultivation of the arts and letters by Lorenzo the Magnificent: Boticelli and Ghirlandaio had large and active workshops. Two geniuses emerged from the Florentine workshops: Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo Buonarroti who after his move to Rome caused general amazement with the production of his Pietà for St. Peter's. When Raphael died (1520) the Renaissance was at its height but shortly afterwards experienced a period of crisis. This was a time of dramatic change. The discovery of the new world, the break-up of the church after the protests of Luther, the advance of the Turks in Europe, all undermined age-old certainties. In Venice, Giorgione's revolutionary depiction of the world in color became more intellectual, more mannerist. The same happened in Rome, while in Florence there was uncertainty, artificiality and a discordant tone in the work of Pontormo and Bronzino. The disquietude of Mannerism reached as far as Fontainebleau, and to the Escorial in Spain. Renaissance Art captures the great beauty and brilliance that flowed from the masters during this extraordinarily creative time.

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