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Poetry, Parables and Codes : Translating the Letters of Indian Soldiers

Author: Hilary Footitt
Edition/Format: Chapter Chapter : English
Summary:
The Indian army on the Western Front between 26 September 1914 and Boxing Day (26 December) 1915 (some 138,600 men) was a multi-ethnic, multi-religious and above all multilingual organization, with at least seven languages spoken among its troops. Censoring the letters written to and from these soldiers thus represented a task which was enormous both linguistically, and in the sheer volume of letters sent every week  Read more...
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All Authors / Contributors: Hilary Footitt
ISBN: 978-1-349-71543-5 978-1-137-55030-9
Publication:Walker, Julian, Independent educator, artist and writer, , London, UK; Languages and the First World War: Communicating in a Transnational War; 115-127; London : Palgrave Macmillan UK : Palgrave Macmillan
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 6078921492
Awards:

Abstract:

The Indian army on the Western Front between 26 September 1914 and Boxing Day (26 December) 1915 (some 138,600 men) was a multi-ethnic, multi-religious and above all multilingual organization, with at least seven languages spoken among its troops. Censoring the letters written to and from these soldiers thus represented a task which was enormous both linguistically, and in the sheer volume of letters sent every week — from the families in India to troops on the Western Front (at least 10,000 per week), from Indian troops in France to India (about 20,000 per week) and from wounded Indian soldiers in Britain to India (between 1500 and 4000 per week).1 As far as censorship was concerned, by the time the letters reached the chief censor’s office at the India Base Post Office in Boulogne, it was expected that a preliminary security-type censorship, of varying degrees of efficiency, would have operated at regimental or local level. The job of the office was thus less the suppression of material, and rather the monitoring of states of mind and morale — that of the Indian troops at the front (it was the first time that Indian regiments had been deployed in Europe), and that of public opinion back home in India, in particular looking for signs of increased subversion as a result of anti-war sentiment.

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