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‘Flipping’ Lessons in a Multi-Section Spanish Course: Implications for Assigning Explicit Grammar Instruction Outside of the Classroom
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‘Flipping’ Lessons in a Multi-Section Spanish Course: Implications for Assigning Explicit Grammar Instruction Outside of the Classroom

Author: KARA MORANSKI Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania, Department of Romance Languages, 255 S 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA; FREDERIC KIM Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Education, 3700 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:The Modern Language Journal, v100 n4 (Winter 2016): 830-852
Summary:
Flipped or inverted classroom (IC) models are promising for foreign language instruction in that they appear to promote well-regarded practices that bridge both sociocultural and cognitive theoretical frameworks, such as allowing for higher degrees of learner agency and facilitating deeper levels of processing. To date, the majority of work on IC models for language learning has been instructional rather than  Read more...
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Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: KARA MORANSKI Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania, Department of Romance Languages, 255 S 36th Street, Philadelphia, PA; FREDERIC KIM Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Education, 3700 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA
ISSN:0026-7902
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 6928049035
Notes: Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 15
Number of Words: 13664
Awards:
Responsibility: Kara Moranski and Frederic Kim

Abstract:

Flipped or inverted classroom (IC) models are promising for foreign language instruction in that they appear to promote well-regarded practices that bridge both sociocultural and cognitive theoretical frameworks, such as allowing for higher degrees of learner agency and facilitating deeper levels of processing. To date, the majority of work on IC models for language learning has been instructional rather than empirical in nature. By contrast, this study examined the impact of IC lessons on 14 intact third-semester Spanish classes (N = 213). Instructors were randomly assigned to either an IC or an in-class presentational (CP) condition for lessons and accompanying assignments on 2 uses of the Spanish pronoun se. An attitudinal inventory indicated that learners in the IC condition rated their assignments significantly higher in terms of perceived comfort, enjoyment, and subsequent confidence in the material. However, regression analysis showed that ratings were stratified based upon several predictor variables. For measures of L2 knowledge, learners in the IC condition performed significantly better than those in the CP when identifying grammatical uses of the target structure on a grammaticality judgment test. No significant differences were found between the groups’ performance on a rule description task or a chapter test. Implications for implementing IC models are discussed.

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