Engendered trope in Joyce's Dubliners (Book, 1996) [WorldCat.org]
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Engendered trope in Joyce's Dubliners
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Engendered trope in Joyce's Dubliners

Author: Earl G Ingersoll
Publisher: Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, ©1996.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Earl G. Ingersoll convincingly argues that his study is a "return to Lacan," just as Lacan himself believed his own work to be a "return to Freud."" "In this succinct and accessible study of trope and gender in Dubliners, Ingersoll follows Lacan's example by returning to explore more fully the usefulness of the earlier Lacanian insights stressing the importance of language. Returning to the semiotic - as opposed to  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Ingersoll, Earl G., 1938-
Engendered trope in Joyce's Dubliners.
Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, ©1996
(OCoLC)605088831
Named Person: James Joyce; James Joyce; James Joyce; James Joyce; James Joyce; James Joyce; James (1882-1941) Joyce; James Joyce; James Joyce
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Earl G Ingersoll
ISBN: 0809320169 9780809320165
OCLC Number: 32168250
Description: xv, 193 pages ; 23 cm
Contents: 1. Reading Joyce with Lacan's Readers --
2. Rambling Boys: "The Sisters," "An Encounter," and "Araby" --
3. Confinement and the Stigma of Femininity: "Eveline," "The Boarding House," and "Clay" --
4. The Joking Male: "Two Gallants," "After the Race," "Counterparts," and "Grace" --
5. Prisoners of the House and Traveling Women: "A Little Cloud," "A Painful Case," "Ivy Day in the Committee Room," and "A Mother" --
6. The Gender of Travel: "The Dead."
Responsibility: Earl G. Ingersoll.
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Abstract:

"Earl G. Ingersoll convincingly argues that his study is a "return to Lacan," just as Lacan himself believed his own work to be a "return to Freud."" "In this succinct and accessible study of trope and gender in Dubliners, Ingersoll follows Lacan's example by returning to explore more fully the usefulness of the earlier Lacanian insights stressing the importance of language. Returning to the semiotic - as opposed to the more traditional psychoanalyticLacan, Ingersoll opts for the Lacan who follows Roman Jakobson back to early Freud texts in which Freud happened upon the major structuring principles of similarity and displacement. Jakobson interprets these principles as metaphor and metonymy; Lacan employs these two tropes as the means of representing transformation and desire. Thus, psychic functions meet literary texts in the space of linguistic representation through the signifier: metaphor is a signifier for a repressed signified, while metonymy is a signifier that displaces another."--Jacket.

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